All in Reviews

Zhongyi Lens Turbo II for Fuji-X, part 2: details and use

After a rather long intermission, here comes the second part of my real-world evaluation of the Zhongyi Lens Turbo II adapter, for Fujifilm cameras. You can find the first part of this review here.

In practical everyday terms, the first thing we should discuss is any concern about manual focusing with Fujifilm cameras and vintage manual lenses. Fact: if you are new to manual focusing you’ll need a degree of adaptation. The good news is that (a) focal reducers introduce zero additional difficulties and (b) current Fujifilm cameras are awesome for manual focus lens use.

Return of the Focal Reducer: Zhongyi Lens Turbo II for Fujifilm-X

It is now more than two and a half years ago that I published a review of the Camdiox/Roxen focal reducer for Fujifilm cameras. I never suspected that this particular blog post (and a couple of follow-ups) would become so massively popular. During the years it gathered views in the hundreds of thousands and, even today, attracts lots of visits almost daily.

This is a solid proof that Fujifilm users (and mirrorless shooters in general) are particularly interested in such devices. What started some years ago by Metabones and their famous Speedboosters, is definitely not a fad but a solid and very useful option.

The Fujifilm XF2X TC WR with the XF 50-140mm f2.8: field review

A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to get my hands on the Fujifilm XF2X TC WR Teleconverter. Thanks to Fujifilm Hellas I was able to use it extensively for quite some time, and here follows my hands-on review.

Last year I had tested the 1.4X teleconverter, and under intriguing conditions too. I shot a motorsport event, using the XF1.4X TC with the 50-140mm f2.8 and the X-Pro2. My results and verdict were that this extra piece of gear gives the 50-140mm lens a serious versatility advantage, without any compromises at all.

Fujifilm X100F: initial impressions (by a X100-series virgin)

Historians of the future studying photographic technology will undoubtedly herald the original Fujifilm X100 as the gateway drug to what became the wildly successful Fuji-X system.

I would venture into saying that the X100 was probably the first modern Fuji camera for more than 50% of current Fuji-X shooters. In all truth, it was a camera that its time had come: a modern look at a timeless design that was also highly practical and certainly affordable for many people.

Jupiter 37a 135mm f3.5 revisited

This is a vintage lens I have previously tested, in another system (m43) quite some time ago. I had also used it a bit on the X-E2 and X-T1. I thought of re-appraising its qualities when used with the latest generation of Fujifilm cameras, such as the X-Pro2, X-T2 and X-T20.  

This is a M42 mount lens, which can be easily adapted on Fujis using a cheap and widely available ebay adapter (lower than 20 euro/dollars in most cases).

Big things in small packages: the Fujinon 50mm f2

Almost a year ago I did a review of the Fujifilm 35mm f2, and this is what I wrote there:

In fact, as I've written in an older post, Fuji ought to continue this trend with the smaller lenses. The 23mm f/2 is on the cards, it seems. Why not see a 16mm f/2 or even a 56mm f/2 in the road-map? Smaller, WR lenses, that sacrifice a stop of light but not optical or use performance. And if the 56mm f/2 seems an odd choice, consider historical examples, such as Zeiss, which had f/1.4 as well as f/2.8 lenses at 85mm. The slower lens was always better edge to edge, smaller and lighter. Ultra shallow DoF is not the only requirement from a high-end optic.