All tagged hands-on

Zhongyi Lens Turbo II for Fuji-X, part 2: details and use

After a rather long intermission, here comes the second part of my real-world evaluation of the Zhongyi Lens Turbo II adapter, for Fujifilm cameras. You can find the first part of this review here.

In practical everyday terms, the first thing we should discuss is any concern about manual focusing with Fujifilm cameras and vintage manual lenses. Fact: if you are new to manual focusing you’ll need a degree of adaptation. The good news is that (a) focal reducers introduce zero additional difficulties and (b) current Fujifilm cameras are awesome for manual focus lens use.

The Fujifilm XF2X TC WR with the XF 50-140mm f2.8: field review

A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to get my hands on the Fujifilm XF2X TC WR Teleconverter. Thanks to Fujifilm Hellas I was able to use it extensively for quite some time, and here follows my hands-on review.

Last year I had tested the 1.4X teleconverter, and under intriguing conditions too. I shot a motorsport event, using the XF1.4X TC with the 50-140mm f2.8 and the X-Pro2. My results and verdict were that this extra piece of gear gives the 50-140mm lens a serious versatility advantage, without any compromises at all.

Big things in small packages: the Fujinon 50mm f2

Almost a year ago I did a review of the Fujifilm 35mm f2, and this is what I wrote there:

In fact, as I've written in an older post, Fuji ought to continue this trend with the smaller lenses. The 23mm f/2 is on the cards, it seems. Why not see a 16mm f/2 or even a 56mm f/2 in the road-map? Smaller, WR lenses, that sacrifice a stop of light but not optical or use performance. And if the 56mm f/2 seems an odd choice, consider historical examples, such as Zeiss, which had f/1.4 as well as f/2.8 lenses at 85mm. The slower lens was always better edge to edge, smaller and lighter. Ultra shallow DoF is not the only requirement from a high-end optic.

Sweet little sister; a Fujifilm X-T20 hands-on review

I had the opportunity (courtesy of Fujifilm Hellas) to test-drive the latest addition to the X-cameras line, the new XT20. During the few days I had the camera at my disposal, I tried to use it exactly as I’d use my “regular” bodies, so you can rest assured this is as “real world” review as it gets.

I have used this camera’s predecessor in a few instances in the past, but, to tell the truth, the difference with the latest X-Pro2/X-T2 capabilities was getting quite apparent lately. The X-T10 was certainly a success in the market, as it appealed to shooters in search of a small, well build, highly capable mirrorless body, with the popular “SLR” style. It is also more than obvious that the X-T10 was targeting the medium-level cameras from the Olympus/Panasonic and Sony competition. Cheaper but still close to prosumer level bodies are desirable to a lot of users, either as nice enthusiast primary camera, or as a secondary body for DSLR and high-end mirrorless shooters.

Samyang 100mm ED UMC f/2.8 macro

After the review of the exceptional Samyang 135mm f/2 (see here and here), here is another interesting lens from Samyang: the 100mm ED UMC f/2.8 macro.

Samyang is going all-out with their latest releases, seeking to cover every conceivable focal length and user request. As with any other Samyang lens, the macro is the same optical formula across systems, with only the flange distance differentiating it for each mount. I used it on MFT and Fuji-X cameras, but, again, all results are relevant to any system (except where noted otherwise).